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Just wondering if anyone has mounted a tablet (Asus Transformer in particular is what I have) to an HD-4000, or has any ideas on where to start?

Why? Because I'm going to try using DSLR Controller on Android as a monitor just to see if it would work out.

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Can someone explain to me why it is the common thing to mount a monitor to the FRONT of the sled as opposed to the BACK (toward operator) of the sled?

When I imagine this layout, I would think that my hands and the central post will be right between my eyes and the monitor most of the time if I'm keeping the sled right in front of me and pointed straight ahead. Is this not true?

It`s true mostly, depending how u fly it. I like sled in front of my body and like that monitor on front sled is invisible. Check pictures to see how I rigged my system with DP4 (Promised pictured to Tom long time ago but never uped them...B)). So far working great, it is bit trickier to achive balans but worth every gram...B)

GCRig01.jpg

GCRig02.jpg

GCRig03.jpg

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It`s true mostly, depending how u fly it. I like sled in front of my body and like that monitor on front sled is invisible. Check pictures to see how I rigged my system with DP4 (Promised pictured to Tom long time ago but never uped them...B)). So far working great, it is bit trickier to achive balans but worth every gram...B)

Yeah, this is exactly the way I rigged it up to hold my phone to use as a monitor. However, I have an Android tablet now that I may try and mount there to use as a monitor, so we'll see.

Thank you for sharing this!

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I bought myself a Glidecam HD-4000 about a month ago for some independant film work and I'm really happy with it so far. I'm currently shooting with a Canon 60D and even though the HD-2000 is probably more appropriate for this size of camera I wanted something that could handle a larger camera down the road. As it is, I've got the thing equipped with a Jag35 rail system and a Manfrotto quick release so it is a little heavier than just the stock camera and it balances just fine.

Anyway, my father bought me a belated college graduation gift in the form of a small HD monitor for the Glidecam. However, he also bought the largest battery he could find for the thing in the form of a Sony NP-F950, which would normally be for a PD-100 camcorder. When I put it on the monitor and mount them on the sled it is ridiculously front heavy. I've taken all the weights off the front and put four on the back but it is still front heavy. Yeah, I could stack more weights on the back and then add some weights to the camera platform but then it just becomes too heavy all around for me to carry comfortably hand held. I can't spring for the vest yet so I need a way to separate the battery from the monitor and put it on the other end of the base platform.

Is anyone familiar with how to adequately wire a monitor so I can run it off an unmounted battery? That way I could balance the base without having to add more weight over all to the rig.

Thanks,

Damon

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Hi Damon,

Have you looked at the Sony NP-F950 Battery Plate with power adapter; see attached.

Here is website where you can purchase this plate; http://www.manhattanlcd.com/product_p/8010.htm

This will allow you to mount the Small HD Monitor in front of the Glidecam HD-4000 sled and Battery Plate /w Battery in the back of the sled.

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Hi All,

My solution to mounting a 7" monitor was to add a small aluminium box at the bottom of the sled post, then purchasing inexpensive rail systems from ebay and attaching them with locknuts to the box. This allows me to move the monitor in and out to get perfect dynamic balance, I've also added a V-Lock battery mount on the rear which now gives me a range of power options and an inbuilt HDMI splitter for the rig, helpful for adding a transmitter for director viewing. I've just installed the curved handle, this was probably my favourite upgrade, it just feels amazing to use now.

The heaviest camera I've flown on the rig to date is the C300 and the footage looked amazing! I've been using the rig on a new series for National Geographic recently which is due to air next summer, the rigs been put thru it's paces doing car to car filming on tracks, presenter work and car walk arounds and I am extremely pleased with the results.

If people want I'll take more pics of the sled and post them?

Rig Pic 2.jpg

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GCRig03.jpg

What clamp is that attached to the post/giottos mino ball head?

*I found one that fits nicely with a simple 1/4 to 3/8 adapter, http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00585CLVS/ref=oh_details_o05_s00_i01

Edited by wlp1191

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Hi All!

Sorry for not posting pictures sooner, been crazy busy with work!

Here's the link to my flickr where there's a couple of photos, will add more soon!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tbpfilms/8205859695/in/photostream/

All being well I'm using this rig to shoot a Barclays Web-commercial in a couple of weeks and have recently been shooting 5D stuff with it for Channel 4 in the UK

Cheers for now!

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Hi All

So the last couple of weeks saw me being booked to do a job for one of the commercial agencies in London for Barclays Bank. I was only told the weight of the C300 camera rig on Sunday, less than 12 hours before the shoot! And so with a quick tot-up of weights the total sled weight would be around 23lbs!! - well over the X-10 arm limit of 18lbs! With no time to hire in another rig I went with the X-10 and my modified 2000Pro sled. After a half-hour moving various accessories around the rig I managed to verge the sled on balanced, I wound the springs to max weight and we were quickly into the first shot.

I have to say, even though I had to take little of the weight through my guiding right arm, the rig performed flawlessly. No problems with balance or weight. We were mainly shooting on a Zeiss Prime 35mm and I was really happy with the results! I am extremely impressed with the X-10!!!!!!

Here's a link to my flickr where I've put a few pics of the rig. The monitor is the new Marshall's 7inch MD HDMI screen powered by the V-lock block on the rear of the rig, the V-lock attached to the bottom of the sled is for extra bottom-weight.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tbpfilms/

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Just finishing off yet more changes to my sled! I've now attached two small boxes to the sled, one at the top and one at the bottom. I have wired a HDMI, a power socket and an SDI lead through the central post. I've also used some sheet aluminum to create a gimbal grip handle that sits on the post - just finishing the painting of this, will post pictures once finished!

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Just finishing off yet more changes to my sled! I've now attached two small boxes to the sled, one at the top and one at the bottom. I have wired a HDMI, a power socket and an SDI lead through the central post. I've also used some sheet aluminum to create a gimbal grip handle that sits on the post - just finishing the painting of this, will post pictures once finished!

Very cool... Look forward to your developments. You are certainly raising the bar on this

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Hi All,

As promised some pics of the Sled developments:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tbpfilms/

The top four photos show the new sled. A new nose box with HDMI, BNC and power socket, connected to a small box at the base of the sled via a home-made curly cable that passes through the centre post - so I can still lengthen or shorten the post. I've also managed to close the hole I had to drill for the HDMI (Steel Araldite, allowed to dry, sanded and then the centre post was wrapped with carbon fibre effect vinyl. I added the power and the BNC cables because I don't always fly cameras with HDMI or the HDMI is being used via a HD-SDI converter on-camera so BNC was an essential add for me.

The gimbal grip handle is made of sheet aluminium, joined with the same steel setting Araldite, sanded to make the join seemless, primed and painted matt black.

The next modification on my list is to fit a wireless video sender and wire it to my spare monitor so the director doesn't have to walk along with you. I have got the Wireless unit, just needs installing now, will keep posting pics.

I've been testing the new mod's this morning and everything works as I would want it too. I've just had a look at pictures of me with the whole rig the day I bought it 5 years ago, I'm finding it hard to believe its the same 2000Pro myself and I'm extremely happy with it now.

I have crazy thoughts circling in my head now about developing a AR sled using the HD4000 as a starting point........

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i went to locksmith to drill the holes into the glidecam. he did it with rounded file. it is about 20mm wide (i hope it will not influence durability of HD-2000 in future) i hardly went thru with minihdmi connector which i cutted of from 18mm x 13mm > 13mm x 8mm. only problematic was the lenght finally which is around 4cm long. going inside was easy worse is going up out which will take me around 2mins to suceed. i thing the holes could be about 2mm smaller but not more (at least with minihdmi cables avilable in czech republic)

That looks great - the only thing I would add is some gaffer tape on the sharp edges of the new holes so they don't cut into your cable(s)

.

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I've come up with a very inexpensive and lightweight solution for mounting my 7" monitor on an HD4000. Total cost was about 2 dollars at True Value hardware. It's a black, plastic trowel which I heated and bent over a board to give it the right angle for viewing. After drilling two holes to match the Glidecam weight bolts I mounted the monitor to the trowel with industrial velcro and ran the monitor battery wire to the other side of the sled where I've mounted the monitor battery. It doesn't look inexpensive because you can't see it while it's in use and it blends well with the Glidecam.

attachicon.gifmonitor_mount2.jpg attachicon.gifmonitor_mount.jpg attachicon.gifmonitor_mount3.jpg

mike

That's awesome!

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Is the best thing to do when mounting a field monitor to the bottom plate to make sure the monitor is balanced alone (without the camera on top)... i.e. assuring weight is roughly distributed evenly on the bottom plate? I have to add more weight to the bottom than I would without the monitor to get an even distribution with it.  Which seemingly means I'd have to compensate by adding weight to the top. I stacked a good amount of weight to the top plate with the camera but I still got a super fast drop time. Do I have to keep adding weight or would it be better to try and remove weight from the bottom?

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Make sure that your monitor is Not overly heavy - sub-1 lbs. monitors are recommended, then counted balance on rear of base platform.   Find camera C.G., then Horizontally Balance and Vertically Balance (2-3 second drop time)

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In response to austinmartfilms question, the reason to have a monitor at the base of the sled is to be able to see your framing AND keep an eye on your walking path so you don't trip. Moving the monitor to the rear of the sled would not be to your advantage; you want to be looking more forward and down, not straight down.

 

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Yes, well said.  It is a Dual purpose setup.    That is the one of changes that has developed over the past few years;   monitors have been moving from the GLIDECAM BASE to the TOP of the Camera, if it is not already on the camera.   However, the overall difference in the field of view-ability, between having the monitor on the TOP of the CAMERA, then having the monitor on the Base Platform, is that you do not have best visionary field of the path in which you are walking, resulting in one way or another a loss of versatility, albeit small.

Also, taking the monitor off the camera and moving it to the base platform, lessens the TOP Weight, meaning a larger (heavier) camera can be used.

Advantages of Having Monitor on the Glidecam Base Platform:

1. Best field of Viewability

2. Removes Weight from the Camera.

 

Advantages of Having Monitor on the Camera (Top)

1. No wires need to be run down the post to send video signal from camera to monitor

2. No power needed to power monitor from Base Platform

Hope this helps...

Fly Safe!

 

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