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Hd-2000 Confusion


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#1 LuckkyAce

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:38 PM

Hi, this is the same email I sent to tech, hoping maybe I can get a response from the forum over the weekend.

"I bought a Glidecam HD-2000 and I'm using it with a Canon t3i with a 18-55 kit lens. I have one plate on each wing and I have correctly horizontally balanced the Glidecam. I then adjusted it so my drop time is about 2-2.5 seconds. Then I redid the horizontal balance as stated in the instructions. However when I walk or run with the Glidecam, no matter how much I have it balanced, it always wants to lean back to the point where the base plate will touch the top of the handle. Do I have a defective product? I understand the use of my guide-hand, but I should be able to walk with a steady pace and not have the thing tilt back. The tilt back process happens fairly quickly when I walk/run but does not show up when I'm balancing the plate: ie. everything looks level and and I can shake the camera from front to back and side to side with not a lot of loss of vertical position.

Using more weight only decreases my drop time, my telescoping base is as low as it can go and I have tried different wing positions. But no matter how well balanced it is, when I do the "run test," my Glidecam will start to lean back and even more so when I stop walking or running it carries that momentum and leans back and the base plate touches the handle. From my understanding I should be able to walk and run without the camera chancing vertical position, using only my guide-hand to control pan and tilt on purpose; the pole should remain vertical as long as there is no physical force being applied.

Please help, I love your product but I may fear I received a defective unit. Or I may just be stupid, which is entirely possible."

Please help guys, I don't want to return the product. I really enjoy it, I just want it working like I see it in videos with people jumping rocks and over fences and the things stays level. Mine would almost right away start a lean back process even though its level when balanced per the instructions.

#2 LuckkyAce

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:15 PM

Think it might be a gimbal issue. I can balance it well at 0. But when I rotate it 90, 180, and 270. It leans to one side pretty crazy like. Is there a detailed description or Youtube video other than the trade-show one that shows how to correctly calibrate the gimbal?

#3 slash

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 03:40 PM

Think it might be a gimbal issue. I can balance it well at 0. But when I rotate it 90, 180, and 270. It leans to one side pretty crazy like. Is there a detailed description or Youtube video other than the trade-show one that shows how to correctly calibrate the gimbal?

I am having same issues with my HD1000. I believe it's a gimbal issue that can be fixed by making adjustments on the set screws. I am looking for a tutorial on that.

#4 slash

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 05:57 PM

I located the gimbal adjustment tutorial in an earlier forum here. I'm still looking for a tool to turn the small set screws...

http://www.glidecamf...p?showtopic=813

#5 Overexposed

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:06 PM

Hi, this is the same email I sent to tech, hoping maybe I can get a response from the forum over the weekend.

"I bought a Glidecam HD-2000 and I'm using it with a Canon t3i with a 18-55 kit lens. I have one plate on each wing and I have correctly horizontally balanced the Glidecam. I then adjusted it so my drop time is about 2-2.5 seconds. Then I redid the horizontal balance as stated in the instructions. However when I walk or run with the Glidecam, no matter how much I have it balanced, it always wants to lean back to the point where the base plate will touch the top of the handle. Do I have a defective product? I understand the use of my guide-hand, but I should be able to walk with a steady pace and not have the thing tilt back. The tilt back process happens fairly quickly when I walk/run but does not show up when I'm balancing the plate: ie. everything looks level and and I can shake the camera from front to back and side to side with not a lot of loss of vertical position.

Using more weight only decreases my drop time, my telescoping base is as low as it can go and I have tried different wing positions. But no matter how well balanced it is, when I do the "run test," my Glidecam will start to lean back and even more so when I stop walking or running it carries that momentum and leans back and the base plate touches the handle. From my understanding I should be able to walk and run without the camera chancing vertical position, using only my guide-hand to control pan and tilt on purpose; the pole should remain vertical as long as there is no physical force being applied.

Please help, I love your product but I may fear I received a defective unit. Or I may just be stupid, which is entirely possible."

Please help guys, I don't want to return the product. I really enjoy it, I just want it working like I see it in videos with people jumping rocks and over fences and the things stays level. Mine would almost right away start a lean back process even though its level when balanced per the instructions.


Hey M8
As you, I'm also a beginner. I use 2 cams so it seems I have twice as many problems?
A 5D mark 3 with an EF 16-35mm L II lens and a 60D with an EF-S 10-22mm.
I discovered by trying all balance points that the 60D can be overbalanced as it is a rather light camera with a light lens (ie: the balance point is so narrow that as soon as you start walking, the rig starts tipping into your face. You may need to balance the sled so it points downwards so when you move the motion is absorbed.
I've found that by using a Manfrotto 357 sliding mount system, I don't need to fiddle with the screws; I simply move the camera slightly on the mount. The mount also weighs 1 lb which allows more weight down below. That extra weight on top and below seems to take care of the issue.
There are also factors which can make your life a pain:
- Does the lens extend on zoom?
- Do you use filters, lens hoods, mikes, etc?
- does the sled rotate when you do your balance drop test?
Please keep in mind that I also use the vest and arm which needs more weight than just the HD2000 for overall balance.
I hope that helps. Let me know so we can learn from each other.
Best of Luck and Regards
Overexposed

Edited by Overexposed, 21 May 2012 - 10:58 PM.


#6 Overexposed

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:45 PM

An added thought to my last post...
I reread your post again. You may also want to consider that jumping and leaping with any system that is designed to provide a smooth flow simply isn't going to happen due to the Laws of Physics.
There is only so much body motion that these systems are going to absorb.
There is also experience that require you to teach your body to walk like a duck without disturbing your upper body motion.
This is only a suggestion based on what I've seen on this forum and on the web.
If it was that easy, everyone would put the Glidecam (Steadicam)Pros out of business.
Like you, for me it's also a struggle to master this amazing gear.
However, I feel the effort is more than worth it for the end results.
Consider watching this amazing artist on how she sets up her gear. Most importantly, watch her walk at the end of the clip to see what I'm talking about.



Remember she is using older gear. The Smoothshooter system is far less complex without having to use such heavy weights to balance and counterbalance your own gear. Watch her other videos, she's highly skilled in making do as an Indie without a lot of money.

Edited by Overexposed, 21 May 2012 - 09:24 PM.


#7 Overexposed

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 10:11 PM

I am having same issues with my HD1000. I believe it's a gimbal issue that can be fixed by making adjustments on the set screws. I am looking for a tutorial on that.


Slash
There is no reason to adjust the gimbal. If you mess with this setting, you are asking for grief. The factory setup puts the gimbal at a critical point. Considering it needs a Torx wrench to adjust, I would use that as a warning as an absolute last resort. To calibrate any device, you always need a given point of reference or it all goes to sheit...(my experience is based on fine tuning laser platemaking devices and very high end proof printers for the printing industry for many years)
Look again at the videos that were interviewed by Ric Kasnoff with Tom Howie at NAB 2011.
I have watched these videos numerous times. Not once did Tom Howie make any adjustments to the gimbal. The engineers that built this system did not make the gimbal as an obvious user adjustment option.
Simply readjust the weight on top and bottom. If you looked closely at the videos, once the mounted sled is almost balanced it has to be fine tuned. It seems that most peoples' attention span does not go as far as also remembering that the left and right adjustments are 1/2 the distance of the fore and aft. Therefore, extra care has to be taken at that step, or it simply won't work. (ie: 1 turn back to front = 2 turns left to right, approx)
Just my humble opinion as a new owner who has spent over 10 hours to insure I get it right for a 2 cam setup.
Regards
Overexposed

Edited by Overexposed, 21 May 2012 - 11:35 PM.


#8 Overexposed

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 05:19 PM

Hey M8
As you, I'm also a beginner. I use 2 cams so it seems I have twice as many problems?
A 5D mark 3 with an EF 16-35mm L II lens and a 60D with an EF-S 10-22mm.
I discovered by trying all balance points that the 60D can be overbalanced as it is a rather light camera with a light lens (ie: the balance point is so narrow that as soon as you start walking, the rig starts tipping into your face. You may need to balance the sled so it points downwards so when you move the motion is absorbed.
I've found that by using a Manfrotto 357 sliding mount system, I don't need to fiddle with the screws; I simply move the camera slightly on the mount. The mount also weighs 1 lb which allows more weight down below. That extra weight on top and below seems to take care of the issue.
There are also factors which can make your life a pain:
- Does the lens extend on zoom?
- Do you use filters, lens hoods, mikes, etc?
- does the sled rotate when you do your balance drop test?
Please keep in mind that I also use the vest and arm which needs more weight than just the HD2000 for overall balance.
I hope that helps. Let me know so we can learn from each other.
Best of Luck and Regards
Overexposed


I forgot to add the most basic, my apologies:
You need a light touch to guide the direction of your fine tuned sled with the hand that is not used to hold the grip.
This keeps rotation and forward, aft movement to a minimum.
This also allows you to change angles as you move through the environment.
As most of my interests are in Nature stills and footage, Tom Howie's advice might be quite pertinent: "Know your area before you shoot it". That makes a lot of sense.
I hope this helps you also
Regards