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Bounce When Running With X-10


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#1 Jerry B

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 10:40 AM

Hi,

I'm fairly new to using this type of equipment and I was wondering if someone could help or give me some suggestions regarding bounce and shaking during running that is driving me crazy. I'm not sure if it is the set-up or if it's just the way I am holding the sled. I took a class at Alan Gordon (Great People) but I'm still encountering this issue.

I run with a X-10 rig with and HD4000.

I use a 7d with a Zeiss 21mm attached to a Cinevate Proteus Rails/Cage. Total Weight of Camera is 9.5 lbs. I added some additional weights to the bottom of the HD4000, making the total sled weight 16lbs.

My arm closest to the vest is set to 4, and the outer one is set to 5 to place the arm at about a 5 degree.

The rig is dynamically balanced.

With my right hand, I slight lift the sled as I am walking/running. My left hand is near the gimbal, but barely touching it.

When I walk, there's no shake, but when I run, the footage is bouncing up and down and unusable.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

Jerry

#2 Norbert

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:11 AM

This is common issue with any modern steadicam. Try to run more smoothly and bend your knees. Have the same setting except the camera. My is a Canon XL H1 with 6x WA. Same problem then running. With Glidecam Smooth Shooter I had no problem with running.

#3 Jerry B

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 08:58 AM

Thank you for the info. When you say running smoothly what do you exactly mean?

Thanks again,
J

#4 Tom Howie

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:15 PM

Hi Jerry,

Your left hand needs to hold FIRMLY onto the sled when RUNNING.
As in, your added left hand pressure keeps the system from being out of control.

Also, RUNNING can mean different things. Try running slower.
Even a CAR starts to get bumpy at high speed.

Right hand has to be firm when RUNNING as well.

Also......run as if running on ICE might help. Keep feet low in the strides.

The cage he is using might be shaking.

#5 Jerry B

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 09:31 PM

Hi Tom,

Thanks for the tips!

I tested out the hypothesis.

First one was taking the cage off, still alot of shake.

Second was running like running on ice, less shake.

Finally, holding left hand firmly, THAT really eliminated almost all the shake.

Thanks alot. Was so excited, that I accidentally put a dent into the wall while running with the X-10 in the house.

I would never have thought to do that. I was taught in class that the hand holding the sled should be as light a touch as possible. Never would have thought to hold that firmly when running. Is their any other situations, I should hold the sled firmly?

Thanks again,
Jerry

#6 Tom Howie

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:22 AM

You're welcome. Glad I could be of assistance.

This is the most common application for this firmer control.

Let me know if you have any other questions and thank you again for choosing Glidecam products!

#7 austinmartifilms

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:26 PM

On the idea of running more smoothly:

There IS a way to run more smoothly. The way we normally run is easier, which is why we do it. It takes more work/energy to run in a smoother way, but it's possible. I'll try to explain.

Normally when we run, we "jump" from one foot to the other. One foot leaves the ground before the other hits in front. Instead of doing this, try running like you would "speed walk". What you want to do is always have a foot on the ground (and always have your knees bent, so your legs can act as shock absorbers). So try to walk very fast until you are basically running. Try to keep your head from bouncing up and down (keep it on a level line). Also experiment with running on your toes only, not letting your heels touch the ground.

Running in this way will helps steady your Glidecam and reduce bounce.

I tried it a week or two ago and it really tired me out (I'm not in tip-top shape currently), but I was able to reduce the X-10 bounce DRASTICALLY.

#8 CaliPVP

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 08:46 PM

Hello All,

This is very helpful, as I to had this problem.